Law student

The Georgia Bar Is Under My Belt

(I WROTE THIS POST THE DAY AFTER I TOOK THE JULY 2014 GA BAR. I didn’t want to jinx myself – so I decided I’d post it, if I passed  – and THANKFULLY I did. I hope the advice is relevant and you can learn from my mistakes. Also, hard work is a great way to get over hard luck – I PROMISE)

Hey Friends,

I took the Georgia Bar this past Tuesday and Monday. I thought I would blog about my experience so you could learn from my mistakes and, also, learn things that I did right!

First, PLEASE fill out your character and fitness forms during the first week of November. Do it during the weekend. Just do it. You will save $400 by turning in the required materials prior the early registration date. $400. Not $4, but $400.

Second, once you know for sure you are taking the Georgia bar, GET A HOTEL ROOM. (click on this link to get one that is walking distance to the testing site).

Third, pay for your bar class. You will definitely need a bar class, just pay for it already. Try get the most bang for you buck by trying to get all of those deals they offer.

Fourth, study. So here is the thing with the bar, you literally get 2 months to study for it At the beginning you feel like you have a world’s amount of time — but here is the thing — you don’t.  70 days left will soon dwindle down to 3, 2, & 1. I’m not saying to spend 8-6 hours studying. I’m saying, go to the library with our outline book, and make flashcards for half of the outline everyday, or a third of the outline!  When you go to the library, do not bring your laptop or your cell phone. Just your book, get it down. NO DISTRACTIONS. Study with a friend — sit near a friend — just don’t spend your whole day talking to them, bring ear plugs.  Have a plan.

Fifth, remember to read sample essays on the GA Bar website! Writing the essays is very formulaic. “The issue is ______. The law in GA is_______. Analysis.”

Sixth, just relax, and enjoy your evening and meals. I ate out A LOT during bar prep, primarily because it allowed me to be social and meet up with friends. Try and be healthy about it (I wasn’t — and it shows LOL). Work out with friends or after bar prep.

I wish I had more advice for you, but the bar is just about studying, learning the law. Don’t buy a THOUSAND things to help you study or read a thousand of blog posts about passing the bar: you’re just wasting time with more stuff, and you’re probably  going to feel incredibly overwhelmed. These bar classes are thousands of dollars, I promise they contain all of the material you will need to help you pass the bar.

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Maxi Dresses

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My best friends visited me this memorial day weekend! I took them to them to this beautiful park. We love doing outdoorsy things, and we also LOVE getting dressed up– so this park was perfect for us! It had beautiful mini bridges and plenty of benches of us to sit and relax. The weather was perfect, and the trees were sky tall, blocking the hot Georgia sun.

My Maxi Dress is from Urban Outfitters. I LOVE IT! I have worn it several times since purchasing it. It’s extremely light and still very opaque. The little splash of neon makes it a fun dress for day OR night! I bought it for $25-$30 on sale this past OCTOBER!

LOVE!

A Night Out!

A Night Out!

The girl to the left is wearing:

Forever 21 Eyelet Dress ($30) and Statement Necklace ($12). Black Nine West kitten heels ($60),  Black Forever 21 purse ($22-30 -I think. Also, I love this purse. it’s so versatile & spacious, but at the same time SMALL!) I wore a light Banana Republic jacket ($55).

The girl to the right is wearing a Forever 21 dress, Pearl earrings,  Nude suede Aldo Shoes ($30)  & a Tory Burch messenger bag!

More Details and Ideas:

I purchased the white dress to wear to an Easter brunch, unfortunately, this year I had no time to attend an Easter brunch, but I did get to wear the white dress to meet my friends parents for dinner on Easter weekend Saturday. The dress came with an orange/brown hue belt, I decided to replace that belt with a skinny black belt, and wore it with a light black cardigan, black flats & black purse. The dress was a hit! I just posted this picture on Instagram and my friends commented saying how much they loved the dress.

When I wore this dress out for Tapas and Drinks I decided to NOT wear a belt, and instead sport a statement necklace (since you can only do one thing at a time, or else it looks like WAY too much is going on). Again, same dress different presentation and still a hit!  When I went to another bar some of the patrons actually thought I came from a wedding (so, I guess this means maybe I can sneak in the dress to a spring wedding)!

Enjoy!

Are you a YouTube Star?

(I am not a lawyer & the statements below are NOT meant to be taken as legal advice!)

Are you a YouTube star? Do you plan on being one?

As many of you may know, YouTube is an amazing way to get yourself seen and heard to the masses. Big labels and production companies are well aware of a YouTube channel’s ability to garner fans and a stable amount of viewers (due to the ability to “Subscribe” to channels).

Unfortunately, I have this gut feeling that many of the successful channel’s, which are getting amazing opportunities to design their own shoe lines, or help promote certain brush brands, are under contract, & although the contracts seem very enticing and appealing, they are actually very one sided. By one sided I mean, the YouTube artist is on the losing end, while the production company or the corporation is on the winning end.

If you’re going to sign a contract for more than a year ( if the opportunity will last more than a year, DEFINITELY get it in writing), you should talk to a lawyer. You should also talk to a lawyer, if you consider the amount contained substantial or if the product could be viewed numerous times or through varying modes of media.

As stated before most of these contracts are one sided. I recently read this off of WestLaw and found it to be incredibly helpful:

      [An] entertainment company that wishes to engage talent on a new media production will attempt to acquire the maximum of rights for a flat fee (subject to the requirements and rights contained in the applicable union agreements). . . . [An] attorney must negotiate all of these deal points (royalties, reuse, compensation for exploitation through other mediums, gross/net-revenue definitions, payment terms, audit rights, etc.) and include them in the final agreement. In both cases, union and nonunion talent, creators and their representatives must think through the potential for future revenue streams and assess how their contribution should be valued. In many cases, the talent and/or creator will likely wish to remain involved should the program move from the Web to other media platforms, such as television, or a sequel be developed. © 2013 Thomson Reuters. No Claim to Orig. U.S. Govt. Works.

I know all of this must seem like a bunch of legal jargon, but  the main point is hiring a lawyer, although may seem expensive on the front end, will actually garner you more rights and more opportunities to collect profits from your artistic work. Also, if a company is going to use your fan base to sell their products, you should have the ability bargain the provisions of your contract fairly, with provisions that are favorable towards you, and that help you remain loyal to your fans.

I’m now going to end this post with videos from some of my favorite YouTube Channels!

Enjoy!

Bethany is a perfect example of a YouTube star. She has a following and some of her videos have more than a million views. Her fans trust her, and I feel as if her ability to influence her fans is incredibly strong. 

Chriselle does an amazing job with each video.  Her success as a YouTube star has, in my opinion, lead to more faithful blog viewers, as well as helping expand her business as a stylist.